Students Help Set Up Event Layout for 2019 UMass Amherst’s Commencement with the Trimble R10

by Alex Okscin

Undergraduate students in BCT and other programs in collaboration with the UMass Amherst Physical Plant assisted the commencement planning team with layout for the main graduation event. Commencement planning for thousands of students takes a village or at least the Physical Plant at UMass Amherst. One of the people responsible for coordinating the layout for events is Surveyor and GIS Administrator Carl Larson. Carl has been in charge of staking out commencement planning for a number of years, but this year Carl has a little more help. With the help of a few students and Trimble GPS equipment, the stadium will be transformed from an athletic field to graduation for thousands of students and their parents. By using the Trimble R10, we have cut the time it takes to layout graduation by almost two-thirds.

For the 2nd year in a row, student interns, Alex Okscin and Rylee Wrenner have helped to layout the chair and tent layout. Additionally, in 2018 student interns Isaiah Cherkas and Daniel Myers helped layout graduation while in 2019, student intern Doug Beach helped Alex and Rylee. We used the Trimble R10 GNSS System to accurately stake out graduation to help the workers precisely put up the various sections of seating for different colleges. This process is important in order to set up graduation effectively in a short time period.

We were able to accurately guide the placement of the mats, chairs, and stages within the 57,600 sq. ft. McGuirk Stadium. We used the Trimble R10 GNSS System to take topographic points underneath the mats to understand where we are once the mats are placed down. This helps to direct the crews as to where everything is supposed to go.

Trimble Tech Used:

  • Trimble R10

People Involved:

  • Alex Okscin
  • Carl Larson
  • Daniel Myers
  • Doug Beach
  • Isaiah Cherkas
  • Rylee Wrenner

UMass researchers using radar to detect drones

Drone flights were in support of a project lead by a Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) research team in the UMass Amherst Electrical and Computer Engineering Department (http://www.casa.umass.edu/). The team, led by Krsztof Orzel and Apoorva Bajaj, wanted to test the ability of their weather radar system to track and identify UAS targets. The Trimble ZX5 hexacopter was flown in a variety of patterns and altitudes to test the limits at which the drone could be detected. The drone was also flown simultaneously with the a DJI Spreading Wings 900 (that had been modified with a PixHawk for its flight controller) which was flown by another independent pilot. The simultaneous flights allowed the opportunity to start to get a sense of how easily the weather radar could de-conflict the two signals from each of the drones. By comparing the radar signal log to the flight logs of the multirotor UAVs, the team aims to gain a sense of the accuracy and precision of their radar instrumentation, and in the future they aim to tweak the signal processing algorithms to yield better results. Continue reading “UMass researchers using radar to detect drones”