Category: Discussion topic

What’s Harmony?

From Joe Pater (pater@linguist.umass.edu) Paul Smolensky explains the roots of the term “Harmony” in Harmony Theory (and Harmonic Grammar and Optimality Theory) in statistical physics (and vowel harmony): http://blogs.umass.edu/comphon/2016/01/14/whats-harmony/ Smolensky mentions a sign change from the statistical physics formulation, which leads to

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Discussion: Paper review guidelines

From Joe Pater (pater@linguist.umass.edu) Bruce Hayes has agreed to let me post the following draft review guidelines he came up with a little while ago (though see his caveat below). I thought that putting these in the public domain might inspire reviewers

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Discussion: Sour Grapes and Use it or Lose It

From Joe Pater (pater@linguist.umass.edu) I’d like to ask whether anyone knows of examples of two apparently unattested phonological patterns, and also raise the issue of what their unattestedness means for accounts of unbounded feature spreading. The better-known of the two is

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Gathering data on gender distribution

From Kristen Syrett (kristen.syrett@rutgers.edu) Dear all, I’m writing to you, because I believe we are all like-minded in wanting to gather data on gender distribution and the representation of women in the field of Linguistics, and use these data to

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Discussion topic: Structured abstracts

From Valerie Freeman (vdfreema@iu.edu) What do you think of “structured abstracts”? In some fields, abstracts for conferences and journals are “structured,” with headings like “purpose, method, results, applications” – I find them easy to read (and write), but I haven’t

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The representation of women in phonological discussion

From Joe Pater. My impression is that women are relatively well-represented in phonology, maybe more so than in other sub-disciplines of linguistics. A little piece of encouraging data on this comes from the 2015 Annual Meeting on Phonology, in which

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Fully transcribed phonetic corpora in various languages

From Caroline Floccia (e-mail) Where can I access lexicons, including British English (RP), fully transcribed phonetically (not just phonemically)? Many thanks, Caroline

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