Month: November 2017

Staroverov and Kavitskaya (2017) – Tundra Nenets consonant sandhi as coalescence

Direct link: http://roa.rutgers.edu/content/article/files/1696_staroverov_1.pdf   ROA: 1325 Title: Tundra Nenets consonant sandhi as coalescence Authors: Peter Staroverov, Darya Kavitskaya Comment: The Linguistic Review 34(2): 331-364 (preprint) Length: 29 pp Abstract: Consonant cluster simplification in Tundra Nenets coexists with other consonantal alternations, such

Posted in Research (e.g. papers, books)

Phonology Lecturer Position at UC Berkeley

Direct link: https://lx.berkeley.edu/phonology-lecturer-position. Lecturer —  Phonology — UC Berkeley Expected start date: July 1, 2018 The Department of Linguistics at the University of California, Berkeley, is seeking a one-year appointment for one, full-time lecturer in phonology with the expectation of renewal

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Abu-Mansour (2017): The Role of the OCP and Syllable Structure in Arabic Hypocoristics

Direct link: http://roa.rutgers.edu/content/article/files/1707_abumansour_1.pdf ROA: 1329 Title: The Role of the OCP and Syllable Structure in Arabic Hypocoristics Authors: Mahasen Abu-Mansour Comment: Length: 36 pages Abstract: This paper provides further insights into the role of the lexical versus output root in the

Posted in Research (e.g. papers, books)

Emile Enguehard, Edward Flemming, Giorgio Magri (2017) – Statistical learning theory and linguistic typology: a learnability perspective on OT’s strict domination

Direct link: http://roa.rutgers.edu/content/article/files/1708__emile_enguehard_1.pdf ROA: 1330 Title: Statistical learning theory and linguistic typology: a learnability perspective on OT’s strict domination Authors: Emile Enguehard, Edward Flemming, Giorgio Magri Comment: Length: Abstract: This paper develops a learnability argument for strict domination by looking at

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Elements [Second call] / Eléments [Deuxième appel]

From: elements.nantes2018@gmail.com *French version below* The Laboratoire de Linguistique de Nantes (LLING UMR 6310 CNRS/Université de Nantes) launches a conference dedicated to Element Theory in Nantes, June 14-15 2018. The aim of this event is to provide an overview and to open new perspectives in this

Posted in Conference calls and programs

Samuels (2017) – Beyond markedness in formal phonology

Beyond Markedness in Formal Phonology Edited by Bridget D. Samuels University of Southern California In recent years, an increasing number of linguists have re-examined the question of whether markedness has explanatory power, or whether it is a phenomenon that begs

Posted in Research (e.g. papers, books)

Simonenko, Crabbé & Prévost (2017) – Agreement syncretisation and the loss of null subjects: quantificational models for Medieval French

Agreement syncretisation and the loss of null subjects: quantificational models for Medieval French Alexandra Simonenko, Benoît Crabbé, Sophie Prévost direct link: http://ling.auf.net/lingbuzz/003491 June 2017 This paper examines the nature of the dependency between the availability of null subjects and the

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Topintzi & Nevins (2017) – Moraic Onsets in Arrernte

Moraic Onsets in Arrernte Nina Topintzi, Andrew Ira Nevins direct link: http://ling.auf.net/lingbuzz/003490 June 2017 The Australian language Arrernte has been argued by Breen & Pensalfini (1999) and Evans & Levinson (2009) to present a case of VC syllabification (vowel-consonant constituency,

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Adebayo (2017) – Some diachronic changes in Yoruba grammar

Some diachronic changes in Yoruba grammar Taofeeq Adebayo direct link: http://ling.auf.net/lingbuzz/003468 May 2017 The major assumption of this paper is that earliest written documents on Yoruba language may be a source of evidence for diachronic changes in the language. Using

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Stanton (2017) – Constraints on the Distribution of Nasal-Stop Sequences: An Argument for Contrast [Dissertation]

Constraints on the Distribution of Nasal-Stop Sequences: An Argument for Contrast [Dissertation] Juliet Stanton direct link: http://ling.auf.net/lingbuzz/003460 May 2017 It has been argued that certain typological generalizations regarding the distribution of nasal-stop sequences can be explained by explicitly referencing contrast

Posted in Research (e.g. papers, books)