Yearly Archives: 2016

Position: Associate/Full Professor, UL Lafayette. Phonology, Phonetics, Speech Sound Disorders

The Department of Communicative Disorders invites applications for a tenure track position to begin Fall, 2016.

Responsibilities include teaching undergraduate and graduate courses at the Master’s level as well as mentoring and teaching in the doctoral program in Applied Language and Speech Sciences. Conducting research in areas of expertise and providing service to the department and University are also expected. Applicants must have an earned doctorate in Communicative Disorders or a related area; evidence of extensive scholarly activity including research publications and grants; and expertise in one of more of the following areas: phonology and phonological disorders, speech sound disorders, speech-language development, multicultural issues, research methodologies or speech science. The certificate of Clinical Competence is preferred. Salary and rank are dependent upon qualifications and experience.

The University of Louisiana at Lafayette is classified as a public research university with Doctoral/High Research Activity, an enrollment of approximately 19,000 students and a full-time faculty of about 620. The Department of Communicative Disorders, in the College of Liberal Arts, runs a BA program with over 200 students, an accredited MS program in Speech-Language Pathology with approximately 65 students students, and a PhD program of about 25 students. There are currently 9 tenured or tenure-track faculty and a speech and hearing clinic with four full-time clinical instructors and a full-time clinic director. The Department also houses the Doris B. Hawthorn Research Center for Special Education and Communicative Disorders.

Located midway between New Orleans and Houston, Lafayette is the heart of Louisiana’s Acadian-Creole region. The city of over 122,000 is part of the Lafayette-Acadiana area with a total population of 550,000. It is the hub of numerous music and cultural festivals and celebrations.

The University of Louisiana at Lafaeytte is an Equal Opportunity Employer. EEO-LA 14-13

Applicant Instructions:
Applications should include a letter of application, current curriculum vitae and three letters of recommendation. Applications will continue to be accepted until the search is closed. All materials whould be sent to Dr. Jack S. Damico, Chair QSN Committee.
Contact Information:
University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Dr. Jack Damico, Chair QSN Committee
Department of Communicative Disorders P.O. Box 43170
Lafayette, LA    70504-3170
E-Mail: jsdamico@louisiana.edu
Phone: 337-482-6551337-482-6551
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Call for papers: “Tools for Big Data in Laboratory Phonology”

From Peggy Renwick

Call for papers
Satellite Workshop: “Tools for Big Data in Laboratory Phonology”
Abstract deadline: 26 February 2016
Notification: 15 March 2016

We are pleased to announce a special workshop showcasing and providing hands-on experience with tools for working with large datasets in Laboratory Phonology. This workshop will be held immediately preceding LabPhon15 at Cornell University, on Wednesday, 13 July 2016, and further information is available at http://mlmlab.org/bigphon.

Research in laboratory phonology is increasingly scaling up to large datasets, from diverse sources, such as speech corpora, crowdsourced data, or experiments carried out across multiple laboratories. The size and complexity of these datasets make technical tools (e.g. for forced aligners, database systems, automatic phonetic measurement) crucial for working with them. The purpose of this workshop is to bring together the users and the developers of such tools, and to meet the needs of both groups. Users (workshop participants) will gain knowledge about a range of state-of-the-art tools, have hands-on experience using them, and be able to access real-time help from the tools’ developers (workshop presenters), who will in turn have a platform for the dissemination of their tools and feedback on ways to improve them for increased use in the LabPhon community. The workshop will also provide an opportunity to discuss the utility and future development of existing or additional tools.

We invite proposals from tool developers who would like to present in this workshop. We welcome submissions on tools that might be useful for any aspect of working with large datasets in Laboratory Phonology, including (but not limited to): constructing, organizing, and searching phonetic and phonological corpora (e.g. forced aligners, database systems); automating phonetic and textual annotation (e.g. prosodic structure, VOT, part-of-speech tags); deriving and extracting acoustic- or transcription-based measures (e.g. F0, formants, neighborhood densities, phoneme distributions).

Before the workshop, developers will provide access to their tools, including basic documentation and a sample dataset; these will be linked from the workshop web page. During the workshop, developers will give a tutorial on their tool, introducing its purpose and capabilities and illustrating its usage through examples. Developers will also be present for unstructured time where participants practice using the tool(s) of their choice on their own projects, with individualized help from developers as needed.

We anticipate accepting no more than six proposals in the interest of providing sufficient time for developers to showcase their tool and for participants to gain hands-on experience using it.

Proposals no longer than two pages, including figures and references, should be submitted to Kathleen Currie Hall at kathleen.hall@ubc.ca. Each proposal should include a description of the tool to be presented, its utility for working with large phonetic/phonological datasets, and an explanation of the kinds of hands-on examples that could be provided during the workshop.

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Tessier 2015: Phonological Acquisition: Child Language and Constraint-Based Grammar

Tessier, Anne-Michelle. 2015. Phonological Acquisition: Child Language and Constraint-Based GrammarBasingstoke, UK.

How do children learn to produce speech? What kinds of errors do they make along the way? What can those errors teach us about phonological theory?

In this comprehensive introduction, Anne-Michelle Tessier examines how we acquire the sounds and sound patterns of language. Analyzing child speech patterns and their analogues among adult languages while also teaching the basics of Optimality Theory, this novel textbook will help students develop a broad grammatical understanding of phonological acquisition.

Assuming only a basic knowledge of phonology, this textbook is aimed at students of linguistics, developmental psychology, speech pathology and communication disorders. It will also be of interest to professional psychologists, acquisition researchers, clinicians, and anyone concerned with child speech development.
@book{Tessier2015,
Address = {Basingstoke, UK},
Publisher = {Palgrave},
Title = {Phonological Acquisition: Child Language and Constraint-Based Grammar},
Year = {2015}}

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MFM24 Fringe meeting: Computation and Learnability in Phonology

From Giorgio Magri (e-mail)

Topic:
Computation and learnability play an increasing important role in phonological theory with many recent developments moving along different lines of research. The fringe workshop of the MFM in 2016 will therefore try to make the point on the role of computation and learnability in phonological theory.

Call for papers:
We invite 45 minute presentations that review some computational or learnability technique, approach, paradigm, or coherent set of results relevant to the phonological community. The goal of the meeting is to provide computational tutorials rather than to present original research results. Practicalities:
— One page abstract
— Submission deadline: February 12, 2016 (same as MFM)
— Abstract submission by email to the organizers (see below)
— Author notifications by early March 2016

Attending:
It is free to attend the workshop, and no registration is necessary — you can simply turn up on the day.

When and where:
— the afternoon of Wednesday 25th May 2016
— at the University of Manchester (close to Hulme Hall, where the MFM will be held; more details available soon)

Workshop website:
https://sites.google.com/site/24mfmfringe/

Organizers:
Jeffrey Heinz (heinz@udel.edu)
Giorgio Magri (magrigrg@gmail.com)

 

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