Month: April 2016

McAllister Byun, Inkelas and Rose (2016): The A-map model: Articulatory reliability in child-specific phonology

Comments welcome! Direct link to Project Muse page: http://muse.jhu.edu/article/612056 Direct link to pdf of article: http://muse.jhu.edu/article/612056/pdf McAllister Byun, Tara, Sharon Inkelas & Yvan Rose. 2016. The A-map model: articulatory reliability in child-specific phonology. Language 92(1). 141–178. Abstract. This article addresses a phenomenon of long-standing interest:

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Moore-Cantwell and Pater (2016): Gradient Exceptionality in Maximum Entropy Grammar with Lexically Specific Constraints

Direct link: https://goo.gl/I7TL8Q Moore-Cantwell, Claire and Joe Pater (2016).  Gradient Exceptionality in Maximum Entropy Grammar with Lexically Specific Constraints. To appear in Bonet, Eulàlia & Francesc Torres-Tamarit (eds.), Catalan Journal of Linguistics 15. Comments welcome! Abstract. The number of exceptions to a phonological

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Bakovic (2016): The Tunica Stress Conspiracy Revealed

Direct link: http://roa.rutgers.edu/content/article/files/1520_bakovic_1.pdf ROA: 1274 Title: The Tunica Stress Conspiracy Revisited Authors: Eric Bakovic Comment: To appear in Proceedings of AMP 2015 Length: 10 Abstract: Kisseberth (1970b) distinguishes rules in Tunica (Haas 1940) that are subject to a constraint penalizing adjacent

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Kawahara (2016): A bootstrap-based reanalysis of Zamma (2013)

A bootstrap-based reanalysis of Zamma (2013) Shigeto Kawahara March 2016 direct link: http://ling.auf.net/lingbuzz/002926 In his recent book “Patterns and Categories in English Suffixation and Stress Placement: A Theoretical and Quantitative Study,” Zamma (2013) identified four classes of English suffixes in terms

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Shih & Inkelas (2016): Morphologically-conditioned tonotactics in multilevel Maximum Entropy grammar

Morphologically-conditioned tonotactics in multilevel Maximum Entropy grammar Stephanie Shih, Sharon Inkelas March 2016 direct link: http://ling.auf.net/lingbuzz/002932 This paper presents a novel approach to probabilistic morphologically-conditioned tonotactics, featuring a case study of Mende, in which tonotactics vary by lexical category. This variation in

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Kawahara (2016): Phonological opacity in Japanese

Phonological opacity in Japanese Shigeto Kawahara April 2016 direct link: http://ling.auf.net/lingbuzz/002934 Phonological opacity involves a generalization that cannot be stated solely by reference to surface structures. The classic, non-derivational version of Optimality Theory does not predict the existence of phonological opacity,

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Kawahara (2016): The orthographic characterization of rendaku and Lyman’s Law

The orthographic characterization of rendaku and Lyman’s Law Shigeto Kawahara April 2016 direct link: http://ling.auf.net/lingbuzz/002935) Rendaku is a process in Japanese by which the first consonant of a second member of a compound becomes voiced (e.g., /oo/ + /tako/ → /oo+dako/

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Alderete and Finley 2016: Gradient vowel harmony in Oceanic

Direct link: http://roa.rutgers.edu/content/article/files/1519_alderete_1.pdf ROA: 1273 Title: Gradient vowel harmony in Oceanic Authors: John Alderete, Sara Finley Comment: Stem lists of the four languages investigated here, as well as data tables for the vowel cooccurrence data are available at: http://anderei.net/datasets/ Length: 25

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First Glossa articles online!

E-mail from Johan Rooryck We are pleased to announce the publication of our first four articles and editorial in Glossa. Please spread the word! Rooryck, Johan. 2016. Introducing Glossa. Glossa: a journal of general linguistics 1(1): 1. 1–3, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5334/gjgl.91 Welch, Nicholas. 2016. Propping up predicates:

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What’s Harmony?

From Joe Pater (pater@linguist.umass.edu) Paul Smolensky explains the roots of the term “Harmony” in Harmony Theory (and Harmonic Grammar and Optimality Theory) in statistical physics (and vowel harmony): http://blogs.umass.edu/comphon/2016/01/14/whats-harmony/ Smolensky mentions a sign change from the statistical physics formulation, which leads to

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