Gerald Friedman says older workers who have been pushed out of the workforce can expect some help finding work in the new, tighter job market, but they are still at a disadvantage. 

Gerald Friedman says older workers who have been pushed out of the workforce can expect some help finding work in the new, tighter job market, but they are still at a disadvantage.  “Things will get a little better, but the benefits will be limited,” for over-50 job seekers, he says. Friedman says he is “reasonably pessimistic” on the outlook for older people looking for work. “These startups want to project youth,” he says. “They have Ping-Pong tables, kids eating pizza, they work all night. They want new college graduates, or even better, people who dropped out of MIT or Harvard. The want a young-looking workforce to attract other young people.” (Globe, 8/28/18)