A team of economists from the UMass Amherst Political Economy Research Institute (PERI) has found that the Medicare for All Act of 2017, introduced to the United States Senate by Senator Bernie Sanders, could actually reduce health consumption expenditures by about 9.6 percent while also providing decent health care coverage for all Americans.

There is national news coverage about a team of economists from the UMass Amherst Political Economy Research Institute (PERI) that has found that the Medicare for All Act of 2017, introduced to the United States Senate by Senator Bernie Sanders, is not only economically viable, but could actually reduce health consumption expenditures by about 9.6 percent while also providing decent health care coverage for all Americans. In a nearly 200-page report released at the Sanders Institute Gathering, the first major event hosted by the think tank founded by Jane O’Meara Sanders and David Driscoll, the senator’s wife and son, the economists outline seven major aspects of transforming the U.S. health care system, detailing step-by-step the actions needed to be taken to achieve truly universal health care and its potential impacts on individuals, families, businesses and government. The analysis, which was in development for 18 months, has received praise from 11 distinguished experts in the fields of economics and health care studies who have rigorously reviewed the researchers’ findings. (Seattle Post-Intelligencer [from AP], Commondreams.org, WCAX-TV 3 [Vt.], Republican, 11/30/18; News Office release)

Gerald C. Friedman, economics, comments in a column about how the layoffs announced by General Motors highlight the ever-larger holes in the retirement system for most American workers.

Gerald C. Friedman, economics, comments in a column about how the layoffs announced by General Motors highlight the ever-larger holes in the retirement system for most American workers. He says, “Companies don’t offer pensions anymore. Social Security, when it was established, was meant to be one leg of a stool. One leg would be the private pension through employment, a second leg personal savings, and a third leg Social Security. Social Security is now the only source of income a lot of elderly have.” (NBC News, 11/27/18)

A columnist writing about issues that should be addressed by the new Congress says raising the minimum wage is high on his list, cites recent research done by Arindrajit Dube.

A columnist writing about issues that should be addressed by the new Congress says raising the minimum wage is high on his list. He cites recent research done by Arindrajit Dube, economics, that finds that a 10-percent increase in the minimum wage will tend to increase the incomes for the poorest 15 percent of families by about 3.3 percent after three years, while cutting the poverty rate substantially. The writer notes that Dube uses publicly available survey data and is able to analyze a large number of wage increases at both the federal and state levels. (Bloomberg, 11/13/18)

Research done by James K. Boyce, emeritus professor of economics, and Michael A. Ash, economics, on how minority communities are often the site of polluting industries.

Research done by James K. Boyce, emeritus professor of economics, and Michael A. Ash, economics, on how minority communities are often the site of polluting industries, but see very little of the economic benefit from those facilities, especially in the form of jobs, is cited in a news story. (Pacific Standard, 11/9/18)

Leonce Ndikumana, economics and Political Economy Research Institute, is interviewed about how the global tax system allows capital to flow from developing countries into global tax havens

Leonce Ndikumana, economics and Political Economy Research Institute, is interviewed about how the global tax system allows capital to flow from developing countries into global tax havens. He says globalized corporations take advantage of the patchwork of taxation policies that leads to loss of revenue for poorer countries where natural resources are mined or collected. (The Real News Network, 11/5/18)

M.V. Lee Badgett, economics, has calculated that India was losing $26 billion per year in economic activity by discriminating against LGBT people

A news story about how Malaysia’s Prime Minister Maharthir Mohamad says he doesn’t think Asia needs to copy the West in accepting its lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender citizens, notes that M.V. Lee Badgett, economics, has calculated that India was losing $26 billion per year in economic activity by discriminating against LGBT people. (Bloomberg, 10/25/18)

A columnist writing about the arguments for and against raising the minimum wage to $15 per hour mentions that Arindrajit Dube, economics, supports raising the rate.

A columnist writing about the arguments for and against raising the minimum wage to $15 per hour mentions that Arindrajit Dube, economics, supports raising the rate, but also says it’s not known what happens when the minimum wage gets higher than about 50 percent of the median wage. (Finger Lakes Times [N.Y.], 10/23/18)

Robert N. Pollin, says if the Trump administration is serious about reducing the national debt, they will have to propose cutting spending on popular programs.

Robert N. Pollin, Distinguished Professor in economics and co-director of the Political Economy Research Institute, says if the Trump administration is serious about reducing the national debt, they will have to propose cutting spending on popular programs. He says, “The likely scenario is there will be pressure to cut spending. If the Trump administration is committed to continuing to increase military spending, the only place where you can get a substantial amount of saving out of the rest of the budget is in health care.” (Marketplace [NPR], 10/16/18)

Lawrence King is interviewed about how the International Monetary Fund is directly or indirectly intervening in the agriculture policies or more than 100 countries around the world.

Lawrence King is interviewed about how the International Monetary Fund is directly or indirectly intervening in the agriculture policies or more than 100 countries around the world. This is despite the fact that the IMF has a mandate that prohibits it from such interventions. (The Real News Network, 10/7/18)