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Stanton in Linguistics Fri. 11/15 at 3:30pm

Juliet Stanton (New York University) will give a colloquium on Friday 11/15 from 3:30pm to 5:30pm at ILC N400. All are welcome!

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Samadi in CICS Thurs. 11/14 at 11:45am

when:Thursday, 11/14/2019 11:45am to 1:00pm

where: Computer Science Building Rm 150

food: Athena’s Pizza
generous sponsor:  ORACLE LABS

 

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Smith in linguistics Mon. 11/18 at 4:00pm

David Smith (https://www.khoury.northeastern.edu/people/david-smith/) will present “Textual Criticism as Language Modeling: Viral Texts, Networked Authors, and Computational Models of Information Propagation” at 4 pm Monday Nov. 18th in ILC N400. An abstract is below. This presentation is to a joint meeting of the Initiative for Data Science in the Humanities, and the Data Science tea. If you have any questions, contact Joe Pater at pater@umass.edu. David will be available for half hour meetings from 1 – 3:30 in the Linguistics department – sign up here: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1n-QWqoWWU5-r3to2WBU0_-LdtOsEzjhZg9_dK8IA9JA/edit#gid=0

Abstract. The era of mass digitization seems to provide a mountain of source material for scholarship, but its foundations are constantly shifting. Selective archiving and digitization obscures data provenance, metadata fails to capture the presence of texts of mutable genres and uncertain authorship embedded within the archive, and automatic optical character recognition (OCR) transcripts contain word error rates above 30% for even eighteenth-century English. The condition of the mass-digitized text is thus closer to the manuscript sources of an edition than to a scholarly publication. On the computational side, models that treat collections as sets of independent documents fail to capture the processes by which new texts are generated from existing ones.

In this talk, I will discuss several aspects of our work on “speculative bibliography” with computational methods. Starting from a simple model of the composition of historical newspaper pages, with applications to text denoising, I describe models of how texts transform their sources, applied to modern science journalism, medieval Arabic historians, and the generically hybrid forms in nineteenth-century newspapers. I conclude by discussing methods for inferring network structure and mapping information propagation among texts and publications.

This is joint work with Ryan Cordell, Rui Dong, Ansel MacLaughlin, Abby Mullen, Ryan Muther, and Shaobin Xu.

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Hollebrandse in LARC Tues. 11/12 12:00-1:00pm

Bart Hollebrandse (Gronigen) will speak on ‘Recursion in Acquisition’ at ILC451, 12:00-1:00pm. Everyone welcome!

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Graf in linguistics Fri 11/8 at 3:30

Thomas Graf (Stony Brook linguistics) will give a colloquium talk on Friday 11.8 from 3:30pm to 5:30pm at ILC N400. All are welcome!

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Jara-Ettington in Cognitive brown bag Weds. 11/6 at noon

Julian Jara-Ettington will give a presentation in Cognitive brown bag Weds. 10/30 at noon in Tobin 521B. The title of the talk is “Number and Counting in the Bolivian Amazon.” All are welcome!

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Vondrick in CICS Thurs. 11/6 at 11:45

who: Carl Vondrick

when: 11/6 Wednesday 11:45a – 1:15p

where: Computer Science Building Rm 140

food: Athena’s Pizza
generous sponsor:  ORACLE LABS

Learning from Unlabeled Video

Abstract:

I will discuss our research to use large amounts of unlabeled video in order to efficiently train models for visual recognition. Leveraging millions of videos, our work develops methods for machines to learn perception tasks such as anticipating human actions in the immediate future, tracking visual objects, and recognizing ambient sounds.  We show how to take advantage of the natural context available in video in order to learn without human supervision, for example through the natural synchronization of vision and sound, or the temporal coherence of motion and color.

Bio:

Carl Vondrick is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Columbia University. Previously, he was a research scientist at Google. He completed his Ph.D. at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2017.

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[neural-linguistics] Forbes et al. (2019) Thurs. 11/7 at 3pm

This Thursday, the neural-linguistics group will discuss Forbes et al. (2019): Do neural language representations learn physical commonsense at 3pm in ILC N451. All are welcome!

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[CANCELLED] Frank’s talk has been cancelled

Michael Frank was scheduled to give a developmental science colloquium talk on November 7th, but unfortunately this has to be cancelled.

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Momma in Cognitive brown bag Weds. 10/30 at noon

Shota Momma (UMass Linguistics) will give a presentation in Cognitive brown bag Weds. 10/30 at noon in Tobin 521B. Title and abstract are below. All are welcome!

Title: How awful are verb-final sentences (for speakers)?

Abstract: Mark Twain, in his humorous essay titled ‘The Awful German Language’ (1880), complained about the fact that speakers of some language put arguably the most important elements of sentences (verbs) last. His intuition was based on the observation that the structure and the meaning of a sentence often depends a lot on the verb of that sentence. If the structure and the meaning of a sentence depends a lot on the verb, do speakers plan the last word first when producing a verb-final sentence? This intuitive question is tightly associated with the problems of sequential planning and working memory in cognitive psychology and the problem of how argument-verb relations are realized in speaking in (psycho-)linguistics. In this talk, I will aim to address when and why speakers plan verbs when producing verb-final sentences in Japanese and English, discussing the mechanisms of sentence production in relation to working memory, sequential planning, and linguistic representations.