Nazanin’s article on Si-Ge-Sn alloys published in Phys Rev Applied

TernaryTemp1_1Being a good thermoelectric material is a balancing act between high electrical conductivity σ and low thermal conductivity κ, because both quantities depend directly on the flow of electrons. Fortunately, κ also depends on lattice phonons, so this contribution can be cut—for example, by scattering from randomly distributed heavy atoms. The authors’ calculations show that adding tin to alloys of silicon and germanium should yield quite good thermoelectrics, especially in thin-film systems.

Phys. Rev. Applied 6, 014015 (2016) – Published 25 July 2016

Ela Correa wins Undergraduate Rising Researcher Award

2016_Rising_Researcher_Gabriela_Calinao_Correa__js_MG_8592_600pxGabriela Calinao Correa

The Rising Researcher award is presented to Gabriela Calinao Correa, class of two-thousand-sixteen, for her dedicated pursuit of research with meaningful, tangible, and publishable results. Gabriela’s Honors Thesis led to the development of a new computational model for heat transfer between 2D van der Waals materials (such as graphene) blanketing 3D substrates used in the semiconductor industry to build nanoelectronic devices. She gave a talk on this research at the fall 2015 Materials Research Society Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts, a rare opportunity for an undergraduate researcher. Gabriela’s faculty advisor is Zlatan Aksamija, electrical and computer engineering. Congratulations, Gabriela!

More information about the award at ResearchNext:

Our invention of folded 2-D thermoelectric elements featured on TTO’s website

This invention, co-invented with Prof. Robert Blick of the University of Hamburg, usTEnanoelementes folded 2-dimensional materials to reach enhanced thermoelectric conversion efficiencies. 2-D materials like grapheme are great electrical and thermal conductors; by folding them, the thermal path is suppressed, diverting more thermal energy into electrical, thereby increasing thermoelectric conversion efficiency:

Our team with collaborators at UIC and MIT selected for the $2 million NSF EFRI 2-DARE award

Our team is part of a multi-university collaboration with UIC and MIT which has been awarded the recent $2 million NSF Emerging Frontiers in Research and Innovation (EFRI) 2-DARE grant to study thermal properties of 2-dimensional van der Waals heterostructures. Read more about it from the UMass press release:

Or check out the NSF summary/abstract of the award here: