Archive for August, 2011

TGrep2

Sunday, August 28th, 2011

In response to Lyn’s query about possible positional effects for distributive phrases, I thought I’d post a short bit on how that information might be found with tools that are readily available. TGrep2 is a utility that allows you to conduct a regexp-like search of corpus that’s parsed in Penn Treebank style, and it’s really useful for asking these sorts of questions. Doug Roland has very helpfully posted some executables of TGrep2. For people using intel-based Macs, this is the probably the simplest way to install the tool on your computer. Download the executable, name it tgrep2, make sure it has the right permissions with chmod (executable), and put it in /usr/local/bin. If it’s installed correctly, you should be able to type tgrep2 from a command prompt and have it display some help.

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positional effects for distributives?

Tuesday, August 23rd, 2011

Chuck and I have a little study of subjects with split antecedents, including the distributive “neither of them”. Thinking about the issues involved in arriving at distributive interpretations, I started wondering if distributively biased phrases tend to occur in subject position. Does anyone know of a corpus count that might be relevant?

LSA online Courses access

Friday, August 19th, 2011

Some of the LSA Summer institute courses have been added to the following worksheet – courtesy of one of the attending students:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AsAWzrlsDdxTdGZUSU5oejRFWC1Ea05xVGdhNnpMMFE&hl=en_US#gid=0

Note: Not all of them are public – some are accessible only if you have a CU account.

Stanford machine learning course

Tuesday, August 16th, 2011

For those of you interested in learning more about machine learning, here’s an interesting opportunity. Andrew Ng at Stanford is offering his annual machine learning class in an online, open access format: Machine Learning. Interested folks will be able to sign up online, watch video lectures and notes, and get feedback on their progress. The class runs October 10th to December 16th, and will touch on most of machine learning’s greatest hits. For people who are interested in getting a firmer grip on the basics of machine learning for their own research, it’d definitely be a worthwhile effort.

Web-based experiments

Monday, August 15th, 2011

On the “P-Side” at least, people have recently been running web-based experiments, and getting excellent results. I’m starting this thread as a way of sharing resources, and also perhaps talking about issues that come up in this domain.

The two projects I’ve seen come to fruition are Wendell Kimper‘s experiment on variation in Finnish vowel harmony, and Claire Moore-Cantwell‘s wug-test experiment on Hebrew denominals. Wendell used LimeSurvey, which we have installed on the departmental server (ask me if you’d like to use it). LimeSurvey didn’t work for Claire (it couldn’t pass a variable from one part of the experiment to another), so she developed her own java-based software that fit her needs. Interim summary: we have LimeSurvey, and it is a simple solution for relatively straightforward experiments – if you have more detailed notes from first-hand experience, please add them below.

We have the good fortune of having Michael Becker in our midst this year, and he has recently been working on web-presentation software he and Jonathan Levine call Experigen. He has run several experiments using this software, and demo’d it for a group of us this summer, several of whom immediately decided to set up their own experiments with this elegant set of tools. It requires a little more expertise in html, etc. than LimeSurvey, but we should have or get that anyway, right? Again, those with more experience, please comment below.

ICESL, UMass Cognitive Science sites

Sunday, August 14th, 2011

The website for our Institute for Computational and Experimental Study of Language can be found here. You’ll find notices of upcoming events (coming soon: Roger Levy, Sept. 16th, Dominic Massaro, Oct. 14th), information about the seed grant program (next deadline this fall), and about labs and working groups across campus.

Information about the broader world of Cognitive Science at UMass can be found here. You’ll find a CogSci events calendar, and the details about the Cognitive Science Certificate.

I’m maintaining both of those sites at the moment, so let me know if you have any updates or other requests for changes.

New experimental linguistics blog!

Friday, August 12th, 2011

Hi all! Welcome to the new experimental Linguistics at UMass blog. We’ll keep you updated on the work, thinking, and events that are coming out of South College / Bartlett halls in a timely fashion. Stay tuned for news!