Phonetics and phonology

The phonetics and phonology program at UMass Amherst is distinguished by its integration of innovative theoretical work with a wide range of empirical research. Phonological theory, usually within the broad framework of Optimality Theory, is developed with typological data, in-depth analysis of individual languages, and experiments with native speakers. Research on learning develops computational theories that are tested on natural language data, and that are used to model data from child language acquisition and laboratory experiments. Research on prosody probes the interfaces with syntax and phonetics, and studies both learning and processing. Phonetics research develops theories of speech perception using behavioral experiments, as well as eye-tracking and ERP methods. The phonetics and phonology faculty also conducts field research, on languages as diverse as Samoan, Somali and Oto-Manguean languages of Mexico.

Faculty

Michael Becker
michael@linguist.umass.edu
BeckerResearch interests:
Phonology, computational and experimental morphophonology, fieldwork, Semitic
Gaja Jarosz
jarosz@linguist.umass.edu
Jarosz
Research interests:
Phonology, Learnability, Computational Modeling, Acquisition
John Kingston
jkingston@linguist.umass.edu
Kingston
Research interests:
Phonetics, Phonology, Psycholinguistics
John McCarthy (University Provost)
jmccarthy@linguist.umass.edu
McCarthy
Research interests:
Morphology, Phonology, Semitic Languages
Joe Pater
pater@linguist.umass.edu
Pater
Research interests:
Phonological Theory and Learning, Computational and Experimental Methods
Lisa Selkirk (Emerita)
selkirk@linguist.umass.edu
Selkirk
Research interests:
Syntax-Phonology Interface, Prosodic Constituency and Tone, Information Structure and Intonation
Kristine Yu
krisyu@linguist.umass.edu
Yu
Research interests:
Prosody from the Speech Signal on Up, Phonetics, Phonology

Graduate students

Maggie Baird
mbaird@umass.edu
BairdResearch interests:
Phonology, variation, and learning
Year started:
2018
Bethany Dickerson
bdickerson@umass.edu
DickersonResearch interests:
speech perception and our phonological grammars
Year started:
2018
Duygu Goksu
dgoksu@umass.edu
GoksuResearch interests:
Syntax, semantics, phonology
Year started:
2018
Kaden Holladay
kholladay@umass.edu
HolladayResearch interests:
Morpho-phonology, syntax-semantics interface, Yup’ik, Finnish
Year started:
2017
Andrew Lamont
alamont@linguist.umass.edu
LamontResearch interests:
Phonology, typology, computational linguistics
Year started:
2016
Max Nelson
manelson@umass.edu
NelsonResearch interests:
Computational Linguistics, Phonology, Learnability
Year started:
2017
Alex Nyman
anyman@umass.edu
NymanResearch interests:
Phonetics and phonology, language acquisition, computational linguistics, and psycholinguistics
Year started:
2018
Brandon Prickett
bprickett@umass.edu
PrickettResearch interests:
Phonology
Year started:
2015

Recent dissertations

Ivy Hauser.2019.Effects of Phonological Contrast on Within-Category Phonetic Variation

Coral Hughto.2019.Emergent typological effects of agent-based learning models in Maximum Entropy Grammar

Amanda Rysling. 2017. Preferential early attribution in segmental parsing.

Aleksei Nazarov. 2016. Extending Hidden Structure: Features, Opacity, and Exceptions.

Claire Moore-Cantwell. 2016. The representation of probabilistic phonological patterns: Neurological, behavioral, and computational evidence from the English stress system.

Presley Pizzo. 2015. Investigating Properties of Phonotactic Knowledge Through Web-Based Experimentation.

Brian Smith. 2015. Phonologically Conditioned Allomorphy and UR Constraints.

Robert Staubs. 2014. Computational Modeling of Learning Biases in Stress Typology.

Kathryn Ringler Pruitt. 2012. Stress in Harmonic Serialism.

Michael Key. 2012. Phonological And Phonetic Biases In Speech Perception.

Emily Elfner. 2012. Syntax-Prosody Interactions in Irish.

Karen Jesney. 2011. Cumulative Constraint Interaction In Phonological Acquisition And Typology.

Wendell Kimper. 2011. Competing Triggers: Transparency And Opacity In Vowel Harmony.