US/CLICK – Cultural Landscape Knowledge Exchange

US/CLICK is a joint project of US/ICOMOS, the Center for Heritage & Society and the US National Committee of the ICOMOS-IFLA International Scientific Committee on Cultural Landscapes (ISCCL).

This Knowledge Community focuses on exploring particularly innovative and well-defined efforts abroad that can be utilized to develop practical solutions to landscape scale approaches in the US.

Click here to learn more.


A Reconciliation of Natural and Cultural Heritage

The Nature-Culture project builds on the idea that natural and cultural heritage are closely interconnected in most landscapes and seascapes, and that effective and lasting conservation of such places depends on better integration of philosophies and procedures regarding their management.

In partnership with US/ICOMOS, the Center is involved in the development and communication of this Nature-Culture link. The Center played an important role in developing the Nature-Culture track at the 2016 IUCN World Conservation Congress in Hawaii, as well as the upcoming ICOMOS General Assembly in Delhi.

Click here to see our reporting from the IUCN World Conservation Congress.


Cultural Landscape Field School

The Center offers graduate students the opportunity to be a part of our annual 2-week field study course in the Czech Republic.  This is a hands-on opportunity to work on a cultural landscape in the field. Students can participate for the entire two week study, or for the second week only.

The field study can be taken either as graduate credit at the University of Massachusetts (4 credits), or as an European Union of Life Sciences (ELLS) course for 7.5 credits.

Click here to access the Field School website.


Sustainable Heritage on the Island of Eleuthera

The goal of this project is to create a comprehensive framework for island-wide collaboration and management and develop strong community control of Eleuthera’s rich heritage resources.

The current project is focused on community archaeology in the southern part of the island, an area less visited by tourists, except very briefly from the cruise ship dock. UMass Associate Professor Whitney Battle Baptiste leads this research effort.

Click here to learn more.