After the Care Crisis

The opening question of a conference titled “After the Care Crisis” at the University of Pennsylvania on November 15 and 16 2018,  was “What would an equitable relationship among care workers, employers, and society loo

like?”  You can find the program here (I hope it stays up!)–unique in bringing scholars and activists together. Started on Thursday night with a screening of the very poignant video, Care, about home-care workers, followed by a panel discussion with representatives from the National Domestic Workers Alliance, United Home Care Workers of Pennsylvania, and Hand in Hand.

Many great presentations, will just mention some linkables particularly relevant to my own interests:   Allison Hoffman putting the economic risks of caregiving for disabled and frail elderly into a larger legal/policy framework,  Norma Coe (and co-authors)  with a new and interesting analysis of effects of informal care on work and wages; Julia Ticona (and co-author) on the contradictory impacts of the the digital platform care.com.

I was scheduled for a talk on the care penalty and the power premium, but decided instead to focus on the  opening question, which I felt invited some much-needed strategizing about big issues: I think that care researchers and activists should brainstorm a detailed “CARE AGENDA” that encompasses paid and unpaid care for all ages, from early childhood education to health care to public higher education to the needs of the frail elderly…

What would this agenda look like? Will try to return to this question in future posts.

Meanwhile, thanks to Pilar Gonalons-Pons and her colleagues for a great event.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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