Category Archives: UMass Economics

An article about the rising cost of health insurance premiums quotes Gerald Friedman, economics, who says people often don’t notice the declining quality of their health insurance until they need it.

An article about the rising cost of health insurance premiums, coupled with increased co-pays, deductibles and other expenses, quotes Gerald Friedman, economics, who says people often don’t notice the declining quality of their health insurance until they need it. (The Herald News [Fall River], 5/14/19)

Professor emerita Nancy Folbre is one of eight economists quoted in a story about how to close the gender pay gap.

Professor emerita Nancy Folbre is one of eight economists quoted in a story about how to close the gender pay gap. Folbre says stronger social insurance, including paid family leave, more public subsidies for care of children and the elderly, changes in the length of the school day, and Medicare for All are some ways to close the gap. (CNBC,  5/9/19)

Robert N. Pollin, Distinguished Professor in economics, discusses a new report from the Congressional Budget Office that lays out the framework for establishing a single-payer health care system for the U.S.

Robert N. Pollin, Distinguished Professor in economics and co-director of the Political Economy Research Institute, writes a column where he discusses a new report from the Congressional Budget Office that lays out the framework for establishing a single-payer health care system for the U.S. He says while the report doesn’t specifically answer key questions about costs and levels of health coverage, it is a valuable tool for understanding how to build a fair and workable health care system. (Commondreams.com, 5/4/19)

Arindrajit Dube, economics, says a new report that finds a link between increasing the minimum wage and decreases in the suicide rate, provides valuable new information.

Arindrajit Dube, economics, says a new report that finds a link between increasing the minimum wage and decreases in the suicide rate, provides valuable new information. He called it, “important additional evidence on the possible impact of a higher minimum wage on the standard of living – or living at all.” (Deseret News [Utah], 5/5/19)

Arnidrajit Dube, economics, say there is a lot of interest in seeing how high a minimum wage can be set before it begins to create negative impacts on the job market.

Arnidrajit Dube, economics, say there is a lot of interest in seeing how high a minimum wage can be set before it begins to create negative impacts on the job market. He suggests setting a minimum wage at around 50 percent or 60 percent of the median pay is in line with what many countries are doing. He says there is also interest in trying to push that a little bit higher. (Wall Street Journal, 5/4/19)

An article discussing promises made by some Democratic presidential candidates to raise the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour cites an upcoming paper by Arindrajit Dube, economics.

An article discussing promises made by some Democratic presidential candidates to raise the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour cites an upcoming paper by Arindrajit Dube, economics, which says raising the minimum wage significantly reduces the number of families living in poverty. (Vox,  4/30/19)

A piece on ongoing parliamentary elections in India by Deepankar Basu, economics and Debarshi Das, states that past voting trends points that though the Mahagathbandhan will not decrease the BJP’s vote share, its seat tally will fall dramatically.

A piece on ongoing parliamentary elections in India by Deepankar Basu, economics and Debarshi Das, states that past voting trends points that though the Mahagathbandhan will not decrease the BJP’s vote share, its seat tally will fall dramatically. This article attempts to predict the BJP’s performance in Uttar Pradesh in the 2019 Lok Sabha elections using past voting trends – both from the assembly election in 2017 and the previous Lok Sabha elections. (Wire, 4/28/19)

 

A new research paper co-authored by Arindrajit Dube, economics, and graduate student Doruk Cengiz, finds that minimum wage increases taking place over more than three-and-a-half decades have resulted in higher wages for low-skilled workers.

A new research paper co-authored by Arindrajit Dube, economics, and graduate student Doruk Cengiz, finds that minimum wage increases taking place over more than three-and-a-half decades have resulted in higher wages for low-skilled workers. They have also found that higher minimum wages have not caused higher unemployment or damage to the economy and have not caused a reduction in low-wage workers. The study also says most of the benefits go to workers who were employed before the minimum wage was raised. The authors say these findings hold for minimum wages that are up to about 60 percent of the prevailing median wage. (City Lab, 4/26/19)