Author Archives: econnews

Robert N. Pollin, Distinguished Professor in economics and co-director of the Political Economy Research Institute, says it is possible to fund a Medicare for All program using a combination of a new sales tax, taxes on businesses earning more than $1 million and a tax on wealthy individuals.

Robert N. Pollin, Distinguished Professor in economics and co-director of the Political Economy Research Institute, says it is possible to fund a Medicare for All program using a combination of a new sales tax, taxes on businesses earning more than $1 million and a tax on wealthy individuals. In addition, funds from other federal healthcare programs that would become redundant would be added to the total. He says such a program should be very popular with the public. (Washington Examiner, 10/30/19)

Daniel Ellsberg, a Distinguished Researcher at the W.E.B. Du Bois Library and the whistleblower who released the Pentagon Papers in 1969, spoke on campus last night, Oct. 28, along with Gar Alperovitz, Janaki Natarajan and Patricia Marx Ellsberg. The group talked about their roles in leaking documents related to the Vietnam War.

Daniel Ellsberg, a Distinguished Researcher at the W.E.B. Du Bois Library and the whistleblower who released the Pentagon Papers in 1969, spoke on campus last night, Oct. 28, along with Gar Alperovitz, Janaki Natarajan and Patricia Marx Ellsberg. The group talked about their roles in leaking documents related to the Vietnam War. UMass Amherst has recently acquired Ellsberg’s papers. (Daily Hampshire Gazette,10/28/19; Greenfield Recorder, 10/29/19)

M.V. Lee Badgett, economics and public policy, is the lead author of a new study that finds 21.6% of LGBT people in the U.S. experience poverty compared to 15.7% of cisgender straight people.

M.V. Lee Badgett, economics and public policy, is the lead author of a new study that finds 21.6% of LGBT people in the U.S. experience poverty compared to 15.7% of cisgender straight people. Badgett, who conducted the study for the Williams Institute at UCLA, where she is a distinguished scholar, says, “Our study shows that all subpopulations of LGBT people fare the same or worse than cisgender straight people.” (Windy City Times,10/22/19)

Lawrence King is interviewed about how the International Monetary Fund is directly or indirectly intervening in the agriculture policies or more than 100 countries around the world.

Lawrence King is interviewed about how the International Monetary Fund is directly or indirectly intervening in the agriculture policies or more than 100 countries around the world. This is despite the fact that the IMF has a mandate that prohibits it from such interventions. (The Real News Network, 10/7/18)

Arindrajit Dube says Amazon’s recent announcement that it will boost its minimum wage to $15 per hour is good news for workers at the lower end of the wage scale.

Arindrajit Dube says Amazon’s recent announcement that it will boost its minimum wage to $15 per hour is good news for workers at the lower end of the wage scale. “For much of the past three decades, the wages of those at the bottom of the wage distribution have failed to keep up with overall economic gains. Most of the wage increase has occurred among the top half of the wage distribution, especially since the 1990s,” Dube says. (Yahoo! Finance, 10/4/18)

A new paper by Michael Ash and James K. Boyce finds that for racial minorities, living near facilities such as gas or oil refineries or coal processing plants did not significantly bolster minority employment.

A new paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, by Michael Ash and James K. Boyce, finds that for racial minorities, living near facilities such as gas or oil refineries or coal processing plants did not significantly bolster minority employment. Instead, they found that minorities living near such plants are more likely to be exposed to pollutants but could not count on them to provide jobs. Ash and Boyce took information from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and did a comparison as part of the study. (Phys.org, 10/3/18)

An op-ed discussing the earned income tax credit mentions that Arindrajit Dube has suggested an adjustment to the program.

An op-ed discussing the earned income tax credit and how it is a low-visibility tax policy that actually works quite well to mitigate the effects of poverty mentions that Arindrajit Dube, economics, has suggested an adjustment to the program. Dube says combining the EITC with a basic guaranteed income for poor people could be a way to boost its positive influence. (Bloomberg, 10/1/18)

Lee Badgett says the Indian economy has been losing as much as 1.4 percent of its national output because of laws that discriminate against the LGBTQ community.

Lee Badgett says the Indian economy has been losing as much as 1.4 percent of its national output because of laws that discriminate against the LGBTQ community. The estimate is this represents about $26 billion per year. The Indian Supreme Court recently struck down laws that criminalized homosexuality. The move is expected to boost economic activity in the hotel and tourism sectors and promote more multinational business ventures. (Businesstimes.com, 9/12/18)

Two news stories about the debate over the impact of raising the minimum wage cite research done by Arindrajit Dube.

Two news stories about the debate over the impact of raising the minimum wage cite research done by Arindrajit Dube.  A new study says boosting the minimum wage helps low-wage workers and puts them on a path to higher earnings in the long term. Dube also is quoted in a story about the impact of food stamps on the workforce and how they can be seen as a subsidy to low wage employers. (Business InsiderHuffington Post, 9/5/18)

Gerald Friedman says older workers who have been pushed out of the workforce can expect some help finding work in the new, tighter job market, but they are still at a disadvantage. 

Gerald Friedman says older workers who have been pushed out of the workforce can expect some help finding work in the new, tighter job market, but they are still at a disadvantage.  “Things will get a little better, but the benefits will be limited,” for over-50 job seekers, he says. Friedman says he is “reasonably pessimistic” on the outlook for older people looking for work. “These startups want to project youth,” he says. “They have Ping-Pong tables, kids eating pizza, they work all night. They want new college graduates, or even better, people who dropped out of MIT or Harvard. The want a young-looking workforce to attract other young people.” (Globe, 8/28/18)