Daily Archives: December 28, 2009

Folbre asks, “Who’s Taking Care of Your Mother?”

UMass Economics Professor Nancy Folbre

UMass Economics Professor Nancy Folbre

In a recent New York Times Economix Blog, UMass Economics Professor Nancy Folbre examines care-giving in the United States.   She argues that women most often find themselves in care-giving roles because of gender stereotypes and economic disadvantage. About 67 percent of care-givers are women, according to a recent survey, Folbre says.

December 14, 2009, 11:50 am
Who’s Taking Care of Your Mother?
By NANCY FOLBRE

[excerpt] Women face an economic double-bind. Taking more responsibility than men for the care of family members lowers their lifetime earnings and leaves them vulnerable, especially in the event of illness, divorce or widowhood.

Partly as a result, older women remain dependent on younger women for unpaid care. They have an economic stake in younger women’s sense of obligation.

The bittersweet result is that the social organization of care reproduces some aspects of gender inequality. And vice versa.

Wolff: Economic Crisis Savages Public Education

UMass Economics Professor Emeritus Rick Wolff

UMass Economics Prof. Emeritus Rick Wolff

Professor Emeritus Rick Wolff publishes an article titled “Economic Crisis Savages Public Education”  in the online newsletter Dissident Voice.  In the article Wolff discusses how the current economic crisis is affecting public education.

Economic Crisis Savages Public Education
by Rick Wolff 
December 22nd, 2009

[excerpt] The economic crisis sharply worsens these public school inequalities in New York. The middle and poorer school districts display higher rates of unemployment and home foreclosures, more rapidly declining real estate values, and more tightly constricted family budgets than the rich school districts. The resulting pressures to lower property taxes will be greater in the middle and poorer districts than in the rich districts. School funding will suffer accordingly. Inequality inside public education will grow alongside that between public and private education. Deepening educational inequality will reinforce the subsequent inequality of qualifications, jobs, and incomes that this generation of young people will suffer.

Folbre on Women and Democracy in India

UMass Economics Professor Nancy Folbre

UMass Economics Professor Nancy Folbre

In her most recent New York Times Economix Blog, UMass Economics Professor Nancy Folbre analyzes India’s imposed electoral quotas which require women to be elected to certain leadership positions.

December 21, 2009, 6:11 am
Women and Democracy in India
By NANCY FOLBRE

[excerpt] But most elected women don’t seem to be tokens. They tend to be better educated and more knowledgeable than the average woman in their districts. Measures of the efficacy of council efforts suggest that women leaders seldom perform worse than men, and sometimes perform better.